Night

Mont Saint-Michel at Night

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Mont Saint-Michel was an unbelievable experience. Once the tourists emptied out, the town quieted down for the night. This was a 15 second exposure that was timed around the shuttle bus that travels back-and-forth along (and vibrates) the bridge.

Memorial Church and the Planets Saturn and Jupiter

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Planetary Alignment

The Moon (99% waxing gibbous), accompanied by Saturn and Jupiter, rises above Memorial Church at Stanford University. In terms of lining up the moon with a building, visit Photo Ephemeris, which is pretty accurate. In retrospect, I should have consulted it beforehand. Instead, I used the augmented reality feature in PhotoPills, which was not as precise.

Comet NEOWISE Rising at Dawn

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Comet NEOWISE rising above the San Francisco bay. I love the soft pastels of the morning light, as well as the clear delineation between the night sky and the coming morning sun.

James H. Clark Center at Stanford

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One of the cooler buildings on the Stanford campus, the Clark Center is home to Bio-X, a multi-disciplinary lab that pulls from researchers from the departments of biology, chemistry, physics, engineering and medicine.

Big Dipper Part 2

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Got all the stars in the handle this time. Next time, I’ll try to get Polaris as well.

The Big Dipper

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One of the easier to find star patterns in the night sky. The Big Dipper is composed of these seven stars: Phecda, Merak, Dubhe, Megrez, Alioth, Mizar and Alkaid (which I inadvertently cut off),

Waxing Gibbous Moon at 65% Illumination

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Been cloudy as of late. I found a rare few minutes last night when the evening moon emerged from behind the cloudy layer overhead. The entire time, I could see the clouds passing in the front of the moon.

Moon in the Gemini Constellation

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When exposing for the dark side of the crescent moon, a lot of faint stars begin to appear. This one was taken at ISO 1000, f/2.8 and 1/5s.

If you are curious about the stars in your photographs, you can upload them to Astrometry.net, which will identify them with an overlay.